Players

monokristalline Solarzelle

Image via Wikipedia

A brainstorm of key players in the field [list is still under development].

Start-ups

Recyclebank

Companies

Among the most interesting Cleantech companies:

See:

Guardian’s Cleantech 100 list (2009).

Europe’s top 25 Cleantech companies.

WSJ top 10 cleantech companies (2011).

Venture Capitalists (VCs) etc.

Clean path ventures: project finance, project development, commercialization.

Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers

Khosla Ventures

VantagePoint Venture Partners
General Electric Financial Services

See CleanTech.Org’s list of investors.

Climate Change Capital: an environmental investment manager and advisory group specialising in the opportunities generated by the global transition to a low carbon econom

Web sites, News & Analysis, Community

CleanEdge: a research and advisory firm devoted to the clean-tech sector.

CleanTechInvestor: publisher of finance, investment and business information.

CleanTech.org: where scientists and entrepreneurs meet to commercialize clean technologies.

EnergyCentral: online hub for the energy industry community.

GreenBiz: Business Voice of the Green Economy, source for news, opinion, best practices, and other resources on the greening of mainstream business

Green Tech Media: Greentech Media is a business to business site covering daily news and market analysis about the end-to-end greentech market.

McKinsey Sustainability & Resource productivity practice.

Skipso: an online platform and business to business marketplace focused on sustainable innovation.

Thompson Reuters Point Carbon: provider of news, analysis and consulting services for European and global power, gas and carbon markets.

People

Rob Day, Partner, Black Coral Capital, Boston, MA, USA. (see Rob’s blog).

Neil M. Dikeman, Partner, Jane Capital Partners & Founder of Cleantech.org & Contributing Editor of AltEnergyStocks.com

Nick Parker

Ron Pernick

Keith Raab

Scott G. Smith, US Cleantech leader, Deloitte

Clint Wilder

Academics

William Aulet, MIT Entrepreneurship Center

Mark T. Donohue, Cleantech Entrepreneur-in-residence, Babson College.

Ernest Moniz, MIT

William Moomaw

Books

Ron Pernick and Clint Wilder, The Cleantech Revolution: Discover the top trends, technologies and companies to watch (2008), Harper Paperbacks.

Governments, Institutions, Policy, Clusters

Americans for Energy Policy Leadership

IEA Policies and Measures Database

New England Clean Energy Council

REN21: the Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century.

Renewable Energy Policy (Wikipedia entry)

See an overview of Clean Energy Clusters.

See Cleantech’s Policy Gap

Pew Center

National policies

US Energy policy

Regions

What are the top regions for clean tech? Traditionally, one would say Silicon Valley and Boston/Cambridge in the USA, but China bypassed US investments in 2010, and Europe is investing heavily.

Countries

Top contenders for clean tech reign are USA, China, Canada, Germany, UK, and Sweden.

Norway cleantech

Centre for Renewable Energy

Cities

Top cleantech cities include Boston and San Francisco.

See top 10 Cleantech cities in US

Boston cleantech

Top 10 reasons why Boston is a clean tech city

BostonCleanTechVentureDay

Massachusetts Clean Energy Center

MIT Clean Energy Prize

MIT Energy Club

Boston cleantech startups include Digital LumensQteros.

Boston Cleantech calendar

Industry Organizations (non profits)

European Climate Foundation: aims to promote climate and energy policies that greatly reduce Europe’s greenhouse gas emissions and help Europe play an even stronger international leadership role in mitigating climate change.

Business models

A business model is the method by which a company generates revenue and should specify where it is positioned in the value chain in order to solve customer problems and deliver profit to its owners or shareholders. Top Cleantech business models include:

  • Subsidies in regulated markets (the traditional model)
  • B2G – Business to Government
  • B2B – Business to Business
  • B2C – Business to Consumer

Some companies make products, other deliver services or both.

All companies have a way of engaging its constituents, stakeholders and customers, be it by:

  • auctions
  • brokerage
  • advertising
  • infomediary
  • merchant
  • manufacturer
  • subscription
  • affiliate
  • utility
  • community

See Business models on the web

In Cleantech, disruptive yet system changing models are at work.

Best Practice

Bad Practice

Corn ethanol bubble

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